Electrum 2.7 with better multisig hardware wallet support and Ledger Nano S

Electrum has been my favorite Bitoin wallet software for a very long time. The reason I had a look at it initially was because there was a debian package. Only when Trezor hardware wallet support was added and was not yet released, I downloaded the sources. It is written in Python. I work with python regularly, but it is not my primary language. But for frequently updating and testing experimental software, it is pretty cool. That’s how I started to report bugs in the unreleased development branch, and sometimes even committing the patches myself.
But the reason I’m writing this post is, that the new 2.7 release contains two features that are important to me.

Ledger Nano S

One is that the Ledger devices now also support multisig with electrum. I took this as the trigger to order a Nano S. It works totally different from the HW1 in that it has a display. Thus you can set it up without an air gapped computer. With only the two buttons, you can navigate through the whole setup process. As a bonus it is also to my knowledge the first hardware device to store Ethereum tokens, not counting experiments such as quorum. So I finally moved my presales ETH.

Multisig with hardware wallets

I wrote about multisig with hardware wallets before. But Thomas took it a huge step further. Now it’s not only super secure, but also super user friendly. Now the hardware wallets are directly connected to the multisig wallet. No more saving unsigned transactions to files and load in the other wallet. You can still do that if you have the signing devices distributed geographically. Given a solid backup and redundancy strategy, you can now also have a 3 of 3 multisig hardware wallet. So your bitcoins would still be secure if your computer was hacked, and two of the three major BitCoin hardware wallets had a problem, which is very very unlikely.

The only thing still missing is the debian package for the 2.7 version.

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My new notebook

Last week I finally received my new notebook. It was a long journey, but it was worth it. If you didn’t follow my blog, you can read about it here, here and here.


It was delivered in two pieces. The first box contained the notebook, and was delivered normally. The second box contained the docking station and an additional power supply. For the second box I had to send a copy of the invoice to the tax office. I expected Dell to place the required documents inside the boxes. But since it was a domestic delivery for Dell, they didn’t. And I forgot to tell my friend who re-shipped them to check. So when the second box was delivered, I had to pay the import taxes for the whole order in one go. That wouldn’t be a problem in itself, but an announcement would have been nice. Because I don’t usually walk around with so much money, I had to ask the whole team to borrow some cash. Yeah, cash was the only option.

First impression

As expected, the first impression was great. And I had high expectations because I owned a previous model already. The border less screen is a blast. The large bezel of some other devices is such an useless waste of space. Also the docking station works flawlessly. I had somehow the impression they had different models for America and Europe. But other than the power cord, I couldn’t tell anything that wouldn’t fit. Only one USB-C cable is between the dock and the notebook. This is enough for charging the notebook, connecting external monitors, USB3 devices and sound. Funny enough the Bluetooth LE Mouse has shorter wakeup times when the docking station is plugged in.
I don’t insist on linux being pre-installed to save the time installing. It is to make sure the drivers stay available also in the future. I want to make sure that the OEM’s are aware of the people who want to have sane operating systems on their devices. It is essentially the same reason I insisted on paying with BitCoin. It is my money that I spend, and thus I want my purchase to show up in the appropriate columns of the statistics. If people don’t care, some corrupt middle managers just make certain options harder to get and then claim nobody wanted them.
The only item that is not according to my wish list is the keyboard layout. I wanted a Swiss layout, but made the compromise to get a US keyboard because the other factors were more important to me. The plan was to get a swiss keyboard, and retrofit it myself. But when I look at the device now, I figured out that this wouldn’t be easy, as it would require a European palm rest. Thus I abandoned that plan. I had devices with US keyboards before. It’s no big deal, I just prefer the Swiss layout.


Every time I set up a new device, I follow the guides for installing with smartcard backed full disk encryption and smartcard backed ssh. I wanted to automate this process for a while. So I used the opportunity to write the scripts this time. Since I wanted the procedure to work reproducibly, I started over every time I missed something. In the end I installed the OS at least five times. The next script for installing all the software including those from personal packet archives is a classic. I probably created it almost a decade ago, and always refined it. I once tried to do something similar for Windows at work. But in the end I abandoned it.


No system is perfect, and especially notebooks are known to not always have perfect driver support for linux kernels. The Sputnik team certainly does a great job with routing all their tweaks upstream. So far, I only found two minor problems. Wifi and the touchscreen didn’t work after resuming. Since I use full disk encryption I, suspend only occasionally. The boot times are really ok anyway. This is my first notebook with a touch screen. I force myself to use it sometimes, but on such a small high res screen my fingers are just too big. So, it’s nice to have, but hardly essential.
It is also my first device with a 4k screen. Ubuntu does great with the scaling and settings. The only applications that don’t fully support high res that I found so far, are: electrum, bitsquare and openbazaar. Oh, and it would be nice if the applications used the DPI scaling of the screen they are currently displaying.
Last but not least, the battery time didn’t impress me the only two times I ran on battery so far. It hardly lasts for a full movie. But I will try terminating all my background tasks next time.

Categories: BitCoin, Software | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Decentralized websites and more

“Cool idea, but to be of any use, it would need more functionality and more content” was my impression when I first looked into zeronet. Back then static web pages were all there was, and no UI support for any managing tasks. The next time I checked, probably more than half a year later, it had a blog engine, subscription on the welcome page, mail, chat, forums, wiki, boards and more. Blogs was what hooked me this time. The interesting feature was that you could subscribe, and have the news listed on the hello page. So I started to write new blog posts both on wordpress and on zeronet. True, wordpress has lots of more functionality than the zeronet blog engine. Some things are nice gimmicks, but none of it is really essential. ZeroBlog is really all you need.
Some people started to leave twister for zeronet, but I couldn’t quite understand why. For me, it filled another niche. They are both very nice in their own way.

How it works

To create a site, you can execute a python command on the commandline, or simply clone an existing zite. In both cases, a private key is generated that you need to later sign the content. Signing is really easy, but you better take good care for your private keys. Make sure not to share them, but do make backups for yourself. From the private key, a public key is derived and from that a BitCoin address. The BitCoin address serves as the unique identifier for your zite. If this identifier looks too complicated, you can register a shorter name on the NameCoin blockchain, and link it to your bitcoin address for the zite. Once you sign and publish your zite, you can give the address to your friends, or publish it where other people can pick it up. Whenever another zeronet user requests your address, he sends the query into the mesh. Whoever is closest, serves the files anonymously. Now the user who visited, becomes a seeder who also serves your content. No central server required. Now you can switch off all your computers, and your zite is available. Your zite stays online for as long as there is at least one other user seeding it.


To visit zeronet sites, or simply zites as they are called, you should run the zeronet client. The software is written in python with few dependencies. So it is really easy to run. You can either run it locally, or on a personal server. Then just visit the entry page with the browser and navigate from there. But if you want to visit a zite without installing any software, there are also public proxies. There are many reasons why running the software is better than using these proxies, but I won’t go into the details now. And I don’t list the proxies here.


Then came merger zites. I read about the concept before the release, and was really curious. Some things are not as easy to accomplish with a decentralized anonymous system as with a centralized architecture. But when I had my first play with ZeroMe, my reaction was “Wow this is what I have been waiting for”. I don’t use most social media because of the centralized architecture, and because they own all the data of the users and can make with it whatever they please. There have been decentralized social platforms before, but they were usually a hassle to install and maintain or not so great from a usability standpoint. Now with ZeroMe you choose a hub to store your data, an identity provider, and a presentation. So you have three orthogonal aspects to your experience.

Data Hub

You can subscribe to as many hubs as you wish, but store your data to only one of them per identity. They can be organized by region, language or interests. The more you subscribe to, the more data will be stored on your harddrive, and the more bandwidth will be consumed. You can also run your own hub, and use it only with your friends.


The identities existed for a while. You needed an identity to write a blog, to comment on other people’s blogs, to write and receive ZeroMail, to write to boards and chats and talks and wikis. Again different identity providers have different requirements. For ZeroId you have to register your handle on the namecoin blockchain. For Zeroverse you had to send a bitmessage. For KaffieId no external proof is required. You can maintain as many identities as you like. Some can be more credible, others totally anonymous.


The official frontend is Me.ZeroNetwork.bit. But as it is all opensource. The first forks or clones started to appear. There is the darker themed Dark ZeroMe. There is ZeroMe Plus which adds some nice features.

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Hike and Fly the “Kleiner Mythen”

I used to hike the smaller Mythen at least once a year with a paraglider on the back to fly down. Usually i took the Chaemi route which involves some light climbing. Many times I saw mountain goats, and once I slept near the top. Last year I didn’t make it, so I wanted to revive the tradition. Last Thursday I sent messages to some friends asking who would join. Pascal came. With good company the whole trip is even more pleasant. Just before we reached the summit, the fog came in and blocked the view in takeoff direction. We decided to descend. We almost reached Zwischenmythen when the fog lifted. So we hiked up again. The reward was a gentle glide into the sunset. I appreciated every second of the flight a lot more then if I went up with a cablecar.


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Worst customer experience ever

The best notebook ever

I blogged about my attempts to buy a decent notebook here before. But let’s recap quickly. In the fall of 2013 I bought a Dell XPS13 Developer edition. When Dell shortly thereafter announced that they now accept BitCoin, I had the feeling I missed out on that opportunity. Nevertheless, it was the best computer I ever had. As it came with ubuntu preinstalled, there was no hassle with drivers. Everything just worked, it was lightning fast and gorgeous. But in February 2015 it was stolen.

Paying with BitCoin

I wanted to buy the same notebook again, but this time I wanted to pay with BitCoin. The option was not available for the Swiss market, but they expanded it to Canada and the UK. I really didn’t want to find out that it would be possible in Switzerland just after I ordered. Thus I decided to hold my breadth. The waiting became very long, as my ancient intermediary notebook was having thermal issues.


The selection of ultrabooks with linux pre-installed, that can be bought with BitCoin is not so large. If It has to have a backlit Swiss keyboard, it gets really difficult. But somehow I learned about purism. Their librem notebooks looked very good. As with most startups, the people were really approachable and helpful. I was ready to order their best machine, but they kept having delays. Delivery was always two months out. When it was pushed way back again, I decided I didn’t want to wait any longer, and re-targeted for the Dell.


After a lot more than a year of waiting, and asking Dell to make the leap forward, I was ready to give up the Swiss keyboard. I was ready to order from the UK instead. I was ready to retrofit a Swiss keyboard myself, and pay double taxes. I found a service that would forward the parcel. But although BitCoin was listed as a payment option on the UK Dell website, the option was not available on the checkout screen. I reported this to Dell customer support and tried on a regular basis over the course of a month. Finally I gave up on the UK store.


The US store had a model with a 1TB SSD that was even better than the models offered in the European stores. So I went for that. All the mail forwarding services in the US either couldn’t process my card to cover their fees, or didn’t provide a phone number. But a domestic phone number was required for the order form at the Dell store. So I asked around if I could have my order delivered to somebody in the US, and he would forward it to me. A former co-worker who lives in California now agreed. I went ahead and placed the order to his address. Because I was really in need of the device, I chose the faster, more expensive delivery method. Shortly after I paid, I received an eMail stating that the formal order confirmation should follow in two days at the latest.

Black hole

That was the one and only, and the last communication I received from Dell. After a week I started to question why I didn’t receive the formal confirmation, and I found out that the order didn’t appear on the order status page. So I tried to contact Dell order support. In order to initiate a support session, one has to enter the order number. And because the order was not properly in the system, I couldn’t contact them. I tried different means to contact them almost on a daily basis. This week I could finally chat with a support representative. He couldn’t find my order in the system neither, and gave me an eMail address. So I wrote to what appears to be the main eMail address for customer support in the US. An automated response came immediately stating that a human would respond within 24 hours. Nobody ever did of course. I reached out to coinbase to ask about my transaction. They very quickly responded. They stated that on their side everything went through normally, and that Dell indeed received the money. Somebody on a forum suggested that the order might be canceled because of some obscure export regulations. But why a company would cancel an order on such a basis without ever notifying the customer is beyond me.
It has been almost a month now, that I have been desperately trying to find out, when I will receive the notebook that I really need. Dell didn’t even bother to tell me anything. How is that different from the worst scams and frauds out there on the internet? To me that was a lot of money that I sent. I thought of Dell as being trustworthy. No more…

Update September 8th 2016

Barton sent me a mail today stating that they found the problem. They made sure it doesn’t happen again. And the notebook should be delivered early next week. Looking forward…

Update September 22th 2016

The box with the precious new power machine was delivered to me today.
Hooray! Finally! Jay! So excited!
Now I know what I will do tonight… Setting it all up.

Categories: BitCoin, Software | Tags: , , , , | 3 Comments

Game modding with pen and paper

I have lots of good memories from youth camps. Some involve playing Donkey Kong and Mario Brothers while sitting on trees. Another classic video game was Asteroids. When I recently read an article in a German magazine about building an Asteroids clone with an Arduino and an OLED, lots of old memories resurfaced. The source code was provided, and the build was simple. As the control was used as digital, I didn’t use an analog joystick. When I gave it to the kids to play, they didn’t share the same enthusiasm that I had back then. But that’s probably because they grow up with lots more tiny computers than we had. So I wanted to involve them some more, and give them a sense of how this thing works. I don’t know how well they understood, when I explained them the concept of a pixel.
So I grabbed pen and paper, read the source code and drew the pixel art. Next, I told them they could modify the images to their liking, but still preserve the mechanics of the game. It was essentially the spaceship with one frame, the asteroid with three frames and the explosion with four frames. Seven year old Levin understood immediately, and painted his versions. For five year old Noah it might be a bit early, but he also participated enthusiastically.
All I had to do was transform their paintings back into source code and load it onto the AtMega chip. Now they were hooked a lot more to the game than before.

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drive in cinema

The last time I was in a drive in cinema was about ten years ago. At the place I was in Volketswil, they no longer organize these events. So I was looking from time to time for another place. The ones I found were too far away. Then I saw an advertisement for Hinwil. It is close enough and on a TCS training area. The slope towards the screen seems to be perfect. We chose a movie that we could watch with the kids: Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip
Because we expected a ton of people, we made sure to be there early. But to our surprise only about 20 cars were lined up. So we got a really good spot in the center of the front row. They didn’t use a projector, but a huge LED wall. That was really valuable for the afternoon kids movie. We tuned the car audio to the provided frequency, and enjoyed the movie.
They had food and drinks and VIP pickups with cushions. The whole event was really well organized. I hope they had more people at the evenings so that they will also organize the event for many years to come.

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Running hostile software in a container

Remember Skype, the once popular phone software? I used it a lot when we were traveling in South America, and international calls were insanely expensive. But I stopped using it when it was acquired by Microsoft, and they switched from a P2P model to centralized servers. From what I could observe, it gradually worsened from there, and I really thought I wouldn’t have to use it ever again. That was until somebody decided that we had to use Skype for Business instead of XMPP at work. There are a plethora of better alternatives. The one I use the most these days is Tox.

I use the Windows Workstation only for things that I can’t do on Linux. There is not much that falls into this category, besides VisualStudio compiling projects that involve MFC. There is Skype for Linux, but there is no official Skype for Business for Linux. So for a moment it looked like the Windows machine got a second task. But running an obfuscated malicious binary blob from Microsoft with known backdoors, that is online all the time on an operating system that can not be secured makes me uneasy. So I looked for a way to run it securely on Linux. The first thing I found was an open source implementation of the reverse engineered proprietary protocol as a plugin for Pidgin. That sounded good, but it didn’t work unfortunately. The second option was a closed source clone from tel.red. They provide their own apt repository with regular updates. That’s quite good actually, if you don’t care about closed source software, and the security of your device and data in general.

I learned about docker a while back, but only used it marginally so far. This was the first real use I had for it, so I started learning more about it. Copying and adapting a docker file is a lot easier than the articles I read so far made me believe. I found a couple of sites about packing Skype into a docker container, but none for Skype for Business. So I took one of the former ones and adapted it. To use my container, just follow these easy steps:

git clone https://github.com:ulrichard/docker-skype-business
cd docker-skype-business
sudo docker build -t skype .
sudo docker run -d -p 55555:22 --name skype_container skype
ssh-copy-id -p 55555 docker@localhost
ssh -X -p 55555 docker@localhost sky

The password for ssh-copy-id is “docker”.

Then log into sky with your credentials. You can do this every time, or you can store a configured copy of the container as follows:

docker commit skype_container skype_business

The next time, you just run it with:

sudo docker run -d -p 55555:22 skype_business
ssh -X -p 55555 docker@localhost sky

I left some pulseaudio stuff from the original container at least in the README file. I don’t intend to use it for anything but receiving chat messages. But if you want to, feel free to experiment and report back.

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A holiday that didn’t start so well


Our camper van suffered three ripped cooling water hoses in the last two months. Together with my brother who is the engineer in charge of maintaining our vehicles, we looked for the source of the troubles. Although not entirely sure, after a test ride I was confident that we found and fixed it. We even exchanged some hoses that looked worn as a precautionary measure.
So my wive and myself stuffed everything for our holiday on the Italian island of Elba into the van. Rather than at 11pm as initially planned, we left already at 4pm. That should give us some comfortable reserve to reach the ferry the next morning. Unfortunately, the cooling water warning light forced me to drive to a service area after only 30km. It was a ripped cooling water hose again. The guy from the breakdown service replaced it and performed a series of tests to make sure the cooling system worked properly. He told us we could move on, but we didn’t trust our Hippie Bus enough to drive all the way, after what happened.


So we returned home in order to perform another episode of How much luggage fits into a vintage grand tourer. With the Jaguar I drove trough the night. I did a few stops for drinks and toilet. After one stop in the early morning, not too far away from the port, the engine wouldn’t start. Oh shit, I had this a few years ago, and remember just too well, that the highly compressed V12 engine wouldn’t start with an ordinary bridging cable. Back then, the TCS guy had a super thick cable and I don’t know how many batteries in the trunk in order to kick start my car. So this time as a first measure, I bought a 500 Amp bridging cable at the gas station. We tried it with a couple of other cars. But through the narrow contact area of the clamps, there would just not come enough power to start the engine. So I called the breakdown service again. He came with an ordinary booster pack, and wouldn’t believe that an engine could require more energy to start than his booster pack could provide. So he brought us to his plumber shop. I asked them to install a charged battery. But they insisted that the problem must be somewhere else. So he carried us 20km to the next Jaguar repair shop. After a while they fitted a new battery, and all was well again. We could continue our journey with a six hours delay. We missed the ferry we booked, but it was no problem to take another one.


The time on Elba was great and without trouble. Water and air temperatures were very nice. It was the first time at the sea for Noah. He insisted on bringing his best shirt: “Mom told me it is only for special occasion. I’m going to see the sea for the first time. That is very special to me”. With Levin we were at the Dune du Pyla when he was 19 months old. He only remembered what we told him, and the photos we showed him. The water was super clear and flat for the most part. Only the last two days we got some small waves. To see all the beaches and caves, we went on a full day boat tour all around the island. A couple of times the boat stopped, and we could go for a swim. Another day we visited the oldest city on the island that we still remembered from the last time 8 years ago. But for the most part, we enjoyed the beach. The guys that were next to us at the camp side told us that every time we were away, people would take pictures of our hippie bus tent. Also when I was driving the Jaguar around in Italy or parking it, I often heard remarks containing words such as “belleza”. Somebody liked it so much that he wanted a souvenir, and stole all four tire valve caps.

Trip back home

The drive home was mostly smooth. Only once we had some worrying moments. That was when I climbed a small hill on the highway, and right in front of me there was a plastic gas canister on the road. It would have been too risky to perform an avoidance maneuver. So I centered on it, and hoped it would slip under the car. Instead we dragged it along. I was releaved that only one hundred meters ahead was an exit. By driving the right wheels on the sidewalk for a moment I could get rid of it.

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The legacy banks in Switzerland

Transaction costs

I have a separate bank account for my tandem flying hobby at the local bank where I live. I didn’t want a plastic card for it, and setting up online banking turned out to be too complicated. So I pay a CHF 3.00 fee for every withdrawal at the counter. That is, if I go to the branch at my home town.
But last week I wanted to withdraw some money near where I work, less than 30km away, at a branch of the same bank. The teller told me that he would have to make a phone call to the other branch, and that the transaction would cost CHF 10.00
That was too much for me. Considering that a bitcoin transaction to Australia (16’000 km) costs CHF 0.02, the transaction cost of the retail bank per km is more than 250’000 times as expensive as that of BitCoin.


In Switzerland we usually don’t tell each other how much we earn, or how much we have on our bank account. Swiss Banks even had a reputation of secrecy up until recently. Naturally when you communicate with your bank, you expect this to be confidential. So I asked my bank representative for his public key some years ago, so that we could exchange encrypted emails. His answer was that I would have to use the messaging in the online banking platform in order to enjoy encrypted communication. I strongly dislike to have to log into different web platforms in order to communicate with different people. Some banks even communicate with their customers through centralized unencrypted social media, thus voluntarily introducing a man in the middle. I just had to accept what they offered for the time being. Hence I used this messaging system to cancel my credit card last year. He asked me if I wanted to cancel right away, or just not renew it when it ran out in a couple of months. I opted for the later. But then it was renewed nonetheless. So I asked what went wrong, and to please fix it. The answer was, that I didn’t specify when to cancel. Of course I did! Whether the message disappeared from the system because of some glitch, or was deleted intentionally to cover up incompetency doesn’t really matter. Fact is, the communication channel failed completely. Accountability is an important part of communication. This incident cost a lot of trust that I had in my bank.

Stranded funds

But the story with the cancelled credit card didn’t end there. Because it was not cancelled in time. Some company where I used a service, renewed without my consent. Thus they charged the card that should have been terminated by that time. So I had to send a printed form for the chargeback to the card operator. It took some time, but the money came back to my card account. And for another half a year, I receive a monthly letter stating the balance would be reimbursed next month. I misinterpreted this that it would be automatically sent back to my bank account. But it won’t. I have to send them another signed letter by snail mail to perform the obvious. As if it was 1995, and the electronic signature on my email was not 1’000 more secure than the ink on the paper.
Maybe I’m just spoiled with how well everything works with BitCoin. But the legacy banks really could do a better job.
Companies that deal with BitCoin usually:

  • Have competent and responsive customer care
  • Offer real two factor login with hardware tokens
  • Encrypt and sign the eMails with OpenPGP
  • Execute transactions instantly, not only once per work day
  • Have reasonable fees, even if the volume is still ramping up
  • Care about the usability of their platforms

And where they have limitations, they are usually imposed by the legacy financial institutions.

Categories: BitCoin, Paragliding | Tags: , | Leave a comment