Buying a Tesla with Bitcoin

The first car that I bought at age twenty was dirt cheap, and didn’t last for more than two years. Then followed some Rover cars that were better, but also didn’t last very long. I was always the last one to own a car before it was no longer economic to fix it. After a while I wanted something better, and bought a Jaguar. Later I wanted a camper and bought a Volkswagen. I have had these two cars for 15 and 12 years. In the meantime they are 33 and 28 years old. The Jag was never an everyday car, and I didn’t use it when there was snow or salt on the roads anyway. Neither is the camper a typical everyday car. But as we didn’t want a third vehicle it would have to serve for weekend needs. I went to work by public transport. Over the last years our beloved Buessli started to fail us, and we used it to sleep inside less and less. Part of the reason for having two cars was redundancy. But lately when the camper had engine problems during winter, we ended up without a working vehicle. We had to go skiing with public transport. After a while we became annoyed.
Thus we started talking about selling it and getting a regular car. My wive also wanted me to sell the Jag. But I was opposing strongly. Meanwhile my brother bought an electric car and rejoiced about it. In my head an idea started forming that I would be ready to sell the Jaguar, but only to get a Tesla. If only they were cheaper. We didn’t want to wait for the Model 3. I would like the Model X very much, but the price was just too much. I would also like the Jaguar I-Pace, but it comes too late and again the price. So we started to look around for cheaper electric cars in general. One important condition is that the range lasts to the Wallis to visit the family of my wive. That’s where most electric cars on the market failed. Peugeot announced one for this year, but nothing was around for a test drive. And it would be a very small car, not really suited for a family to go on holidays.
Replacing our two special cars wouldn’t be easy anyway. The Jag is a sports car with a V12 engine that runs almost as smooth as an electric. The VW Camper has lots of room and beds and a kitchen. And then the new one should be electric.
A used Tesla S seemed to be the only option. It has enough range, enough space, enough power and is very nice to drive. But again the price … Fortunately the price of Bitcoin kept rising over the past years, and my investments appreciated enough to make this a possibility. And I wanted to buy my next car with Bitcoin anyway. I had a “Bought with Bitcoin” sticker ready for quite some time. Still few people have enough experience with the magic internet money to sell a car for it. Tesla would not sell cars directly for Bitcoin yet. There are a couple of stories of people who bought Tesla cars, but it was only through retailers. The closest being Auto Outlet in Finland. They would happily sell one to me, but the prices seemed to be even higher than in Switzerland. Reading up about car imports wasn’t encouraging to say the least.
So I asked a couple of people who wanted to sell their cars in Switzerland if they would do it for Bitcoin. Most replied “no” straight away. I didn’t want to talk anybody into something he doesn’t understand. So I kept asking. One gentleman agreed if we would make the transfer at a broker. But then he sold the car before I could even test drive it. Yes demand is high, and they usually sell quickly. So when another gentleman replied with a price in Bitcoin, I knew I would have to act fast. The test ride was very nice, and the same evening I convinced my wive, just in time.
Yesterday we went to collect it. The boys keep asking me why it is not as fast as the Jag. I had to tell them a couple of times already that in the 15 years I have had it, I never drove it faster than the Tesla top speed. And the Tesla accelerates faster, which is more fun anyway. It is about 1 second faster to go from 0 to 100. Still far from the model with ludicrous mode, but more than enough for all practical purposes.
The car is truly totally different from any car I drove in the past. It’s a blast, and hard to describe with words alone. People generally love their Tesla cars, but this guy has a very good way of expressing it.

TeslaBitcoin

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Hackthevalley Hackathon 2017 Baar

Motivation

After the good experience last year at the six fintech hackathon, I was trilled to go to hack the valley which is even closer geographically and whose subject is even closer to Bitcoin. My goal was to gain experience with ethereum. So far I only completed the tutorials. I found the technology very interesting, but in the past, I couldn’t come up with a good idea how to make use of it. Neither did I learn of a killer product that went live. This is in stark contrast to Bitcoin. When I first learned about Bitcoin, it was immediately clear to me that this was something very special, something that I waited for without knowing.

Team formation

In contrast to the hackathon last year, most people already showed up as teams. I estimate that only about three of the fourteen teams were formed on site. I joined three guys from a bank in Paris, along with another French guy and a South African who lives in Zurich. First we had to decide on a project. We went through a list with a couple of ideas. But it turned out that for a lot of them it was hard to justify what benefit a blockchain would bring compared to a more traditional approach. That is something I see a lot in the current blockchain hype. Showing up as a team with a formulated idea is a big advantage, as the technology and possible problem areas can be explored before. But In both occasions I enjoyed it to meet new and interesting people and see what we can achieve together in this limited time.

Our project

We settled on the challenge “fighting fraud in the supply chain” with a project that puts smart locks on containers. The devices log all open and close operation on a blockchain. Unlocking operations would have to be authorized by a smart contract. The locks communicate with bluetooth low energy with an app on a smart phone. This in turn communicates to a backend that talks to the blockchain.

Implementation

Shortly after we had the rough concept, the other team members stated that they would feel more confident implementing the smart contract in java, rather than solidity. That’s why they voted for using hyperledger instead of ethereum. Setting it all up and getting the docker containers to work proved a lot more difficult than anybody anticipated. Not only had some team members Windows machines, but also on linux we faced a problem. Namely the docker containers were configured to use the google nameservers, while apparently all outside DNS was blocked by the Thomson Reuters network. The connectivity was generally very flaky.

Infrastructure

I enjoyed working with the team. But that we didn’t know the infrastructure we were working on, complicated our work considerably. The last time I programmed seriously with Java was probably 15 years ago. And we didn’t have good tool support within the environment. I’m sure it is possible to set everything up to work comfortably, but that would have cost us more time even than we lost with the complicated turnaround cycles. In the end, we couldn’t complete our prototype in time. Sure, that is is not a strict requirement of a hackathon. But it’s the pride and goal of every software developer to have the thing perform in a live demo.

Presentations and prize giving

As is common for events like this, the quality of the projects varies wildly. I think nobody in our team expected to be in the top ranks. Even though I must say the presentation looked better than my code.
The project that I liked the most was about subleasing parking spots while people don’t need them. I could imagine something like this generalized to become a decentralized form of AirBnB.
The winners were the same people that won the London HackEthon. During the presentation I thought it rather boring. It was about heart rate sensors publishing directly to ethereum. A smart contract would then take action if the data was out of order. Only after they received the price, I thought some more about it. In hindsight I can see the value in it, and that it was probably implemented better then most other projects.

Conclusion

Thanks to Thomson Reuters and all others involved for organizing this great event!
I hear a lot from Bitcoin maximalists that all other chains can’t compete with the one true blockchain. I’m also invested most in Bitcoin, but I want to be open to the possibilities of other blockchains and smart contract platforms in special. Although I must admit, I never saw a compelling reason for permissioned ledgers and private blockchains. A week before the event I learned about Bitcoin uncensored, and listened to a couple of the episodes. They essentially debunk most of the altcoins and blockchain projects. Calling them ponzi schemes and frauds. This made me skeptical of the blockchain boom, but all the more I was keen to discover good uses at and event full of blockchain hackers. I’m still positive that there are applications that can be improved with blockchains. But most of the ideas have to be descarded upon closer inspection. The only three practical uses for blockchain so far are monetary, timestamping and naming. I am looking forward to expand this list, but it’s not as easy as it seems at first.

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Resetting the Logitech K810 bluetooth keyboard

The Logitech K810 has been my favorite keyboard for many years. I have one at home and one in the office. It allows to easily switch between 3 different devices. It has the same size and layout as most notebooks, is stylish, and a blast to type.
But one day about a year ago something strange happened. When I wanted to type a ‘\’ I got nothing. When I wanted to type a ‘<‘, I would get a ‘§’. When I wanted to type a ‘>’, I would get a ‘°’. And vice versa. So, effectively two keys were swapped. This was only on the Windows workstation in the office. When I switched the keyboard to the Linux notebook or to the phone, all keys were correct. It also never happened at home.
At first I thought this was a joke by my co-workers. So I tried everything on the windows machine: un-pairing and re-pairing. Scanning the registry for uncommon key mappings. Nothing helped until I found a page that described how to perform a factory reset on the keyboard. The problem was solved, but only for a year. Last week when I came to work after the weekend, the very same keys were swapped again. Finding the page with the reset instructions was more difficult than I remembered. It was not freely available, but only after logging in on the Logitech support page. That is why I want to preserve it here, in case it happens again to me or anybody else:

  • un-pair and remove the keyboard from the bluetooth settings on your pc
  • reset your keyboard: with keyboard on and unpaired from any device, press the following key sequence:
  • “Escape”, “o”,“Escape”, “o”,“Escape”, “b”
  • if the reset is accepted the lights on top of your K810 will blink for a second
  • reconnect your K810 to your pc and test it on other devices if possible.
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Meeting C++ 2016

This is my first time at Meeting C++ in Berlin. I came here with my boss Andi. To profit more, we split up during the talks. Afterwards we shared what we learned.
I will complete this post later, and add links to the presentations and videos as they become available.

I attended the following talks:

Opening Keynote by Bjarne Stroustrup

He talked about the evolution and future direction of C++. Explaining the guiding principles and philosophy of the language. He also explained how the standards committee works, and that even he himself is sometimes over voted. He could tell that and even name the people of other opinions without any bitterness. Very professional and focused!
The main point that sticked out was: “zero overhead abstractions”

C++ Core Guidelines: Migrating your Code Base by Peter Sommerlad

Unfortunately Peter Sommerlad was sick and couldn’t come. So Bjarne Stroustrup agreed ten minutes before his own keynote to jump in, and give the talk without any preparation. He claimed never to have had a talk about this topic. He had some slides with the name of his employer, and he jumped around in those slides. Other than this barely noticeable detail, you couldn’t tell that the talk was not prepared. He talked about how to use the [GSL](https://github.com/Microsoft/GSL) in new code. But the main focus was on how to gradually improve old legacy code by introducing the types the GSL provides. In the future there should be even tools to perform the task automatically.

Reduce: From functional programming to C++17 fold expressions by Nikos Athanasiou

He started out by showing how fold can be performed at runtime with std::accumulate(). Then he gave some theory and showed the syntax of other languages such as: haskell, python and scala. The C++17 fold expression operator doesn’t just add syntactic sugar, but open up a load of new possibilities. With constexpr functions, the folds can be evaluated at compile time. As a consequence they can not only operate on values, but even on types. The talker shared with us how he broke his personal error message record: During his experiments he got an error with a quarter of a million lines!

Implementing a web game in C++14 by Kris Jusiak

In this talk we witnessed how a relatively simple game can be implemented with help of the following libraries: ranges, dependency injection and state machine. The code was all in pure C++14 and was then compiled to asm.js and/or webassembly using emscripten. The result was a static website that runs the game very efficiently in the browser. In the talk we were walked through the different parts of the implementation. In contrast to a naive imperative approach, after the initial learning curve this can be maintained and extended a lot easier.

Learn Robotics with C++ in 1 hour by Jackie Kay

We didn’t actually learn how to program robots. First, she walked us through some history of robotics. By highlighting some of the mayor challenges, she explained different solutions, and how they evolved over time. Because robots run in a real time environment and have lots of data to process, performance is crucial. In the past the problems were solved more analytically, while nowadays the focus is on deep learning with neuronal networks. She had a strong emphasis on libraries that are being used in robotics. To my surprise, I knew and used most of them, even the ones she introduced as lesser known such as dlib.

Nerd Party

In the evening there was free beer in the big underground hall. There was no music, so that people could talk. Not really how you would usually imagine a party. We had a look at the different sponsor booths, and watched some product demos. After a while we went up to the sky lounge in the 14th floor with a marvelous view over the city.

SYCL building blocks for C++ libraries by Gordon Brown

Even though I experimented with heterogeneous parallel computing a few years ago, I was not really aware what is in the works with SYCL. My earlier experiments were with OpenCL and Cuda. They were cool, but left a lot to be desired. I never looked into OpenAMP despite the improved syntax. In Contrast SYCL seems to do it right on all fronts. I hope this brings GPGUP within reach, so that I could use it in my day to day work sometimes. In the talk, he showed the general architecture, how the pipelines work. Rather than defining execution barriers yourself and schedule the work, you define work groups, and their dependencies. SYCL then figures out how to best arrange and schedule the different tasks onto the different cores. Finally he talked about higher level libraries where SYCL is being integrated: std parallel algorithms, tensor flow and computer vision.

Clang Static Analysis by Gabor Horvath

During this talk we learned how static analyzers find the potential problems in the code to warn the developers about. Starting with simple semantic searches, through path tracing with and without branch merging. Bottom line was that there is no one tool to beat them all, but that the more tools you use, the better. Because they all work differently, each on can find individual problems.

Computer Architecture, C++, and High Performance by Matt P. Dziubinski

This talk made me realize how long ago it was, that I learned about hardware architectures in school. Back in the day we thought mainly about the simple theoretical model of how an ALU works. The talk made clear how you could boost performance by distributing the work to the different parallel ALU’s that exist within every CPU core. In the example he boosted the performance by two simply by manually partially unroll a summation loop. Another important point to take home is the performance gap between CPU and memory access. Even for caches, it is widening with every new hardware generation. Traditional algorithm analysis considers floating point operations as the expensive part. But meanwhile you can execute hundreds of FLOP’s in the time it takes to resolve a single cache miss. On one side he showed some techniques to better utilize the available hardware. And on the other hand he demonstrated tools to measure different aspects, such as usage of the parallel components within the core, or cache misses. With so diverse hardware it is really difficult to predict, thus measuring is key.

Lightning talks

The short talks were of varying quality, but mostly funny. As with a good portion of the talks, there were technical difficulties with connecting the notebooks to the projectors.

Closing keynote by Louis Dionne

C++ metaprogramming: evolution and future directions
We both didn’t know what to expect from this talk. But it proved to be one of the best of the conference. He started out by showing some template meta programming with the boost::mpl, transitioned to boost::fusion, and landed at his hana library. The syntax for C++ TMP is generally considered insane. But with his hana library, types are treated like values. This makes the compile time code really readable and only distinguishable from runtime code at a second glance. True to the main C++ paradigm of zero overhead abstraction he showcased an implementation of an event dispatcher that looks like runtime code with a map, but actually resolves at compile time to direct function calls. Cool stuff really. Leveraging knowledge that is available at compile time and use it at compile time. He even claimed that in contrast to some other TMP techniques, compile times should not suffer so much with hana.

Conclusions

C++ is fancy again!
I have been programming professionally for about 17 years. In all this time C++ has been my primary language. Not only that, it has also always been my preferred language. But there were times where it seemed to be stagnating. Other languages had fancy new features. They claimed to catch up with C++ performance. But experience showed that none ever managed to run as fast as C++ or produced such a small footprint. The fancy features proved either not as useful as they first appeared, or they are being added to C++. In retrospect it seems to have been the right choice to resist the urge to add a garbage collector. It’s better to produce no garbage in the first place. RAII turns out to be the better idiom as it can be applied to all sorts of resources, not only memory. The pace with which the language improves is only accelerating.
Yes, there is old ugly code that is using dangerous features. That is how the language evolved, and we can’t get rid of it. But with tools like the GSL and static analyzers we still can improve the security of legacy code bases.
Exciting times!

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Electrum 2.7 with better multisig hardware wallet support and Ledger Nano S

Electrum has been my favorite Bitoin wallet software for a very long time. The reason I had a look at it initially was because there was a debian package. Only when Trezor hardware wallet support was added and was not yet released, I downloaded the sources. It is written in Python. I work with python regularly, but it is not my primary language. But for frequently updating and testing experimental software, it is pretty cool. That’s how I started to report bugs in the unreleased development branch, and sometimes even committing the patches myself.
But the reason I’m writing this post is, that the new 2.7 release contains two features that are important to me.

Ledger Nano S

One is that the Ledger devices now also support multisig with electrum. I took this as the trigger to order a Nano S. It works totally different from the HW1 in that it has a display. Thus you can set it up without an air gapped computer. With only the two buttons, you can navigate through the whole setup process. As a bonus it is also to my knowledge the first hardware device to store Ethereum tokens, not counting experiments such as quorum. So I finally moved my presales ETH.

Multisig with hardware wallets

I wrote about multisig with hardware wallets before. But Thomas took it a huge step further. Now it’s not only super secure, but also super user friendly. Now the hardware wallets are directly connected to the multisig wallet. No more saving unsigned transactions to files and load in the other wallet. You can still do that if you have the signing devices distributed geographically. Given a solid backup and redundancy strategy, you can now also have a 3 of 3 multisig hardware wallet. So your bitcoins would still be secure if your computer was hacked, and two of the three major BitCoin hardware wallets had a problem, which is very very unlikely.

The only thing still missing is the debian package for the 2.7 version.

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My new notebook

Last week I finally received my new notebook. It was a long journey, but it was worth it. If you didn’t follow my blog, you can read about it here, here and here.

Delivery

It was delivered in two pieces. The first box contained the notebook, and was delivered normally. The second box contained the docking station and an additional power supply. For the second box I had to send a copy of the invoice to the tax office. I expected Dell to place the required documents inside the boxes. But since it was a domestic delivery for Dell, they didn’t. And I forgot to tell my friend who re-shipped them to check. So when the second box was delivered, I had to pay the import taxes for the whole order in one go. That wouldn’t be a problem in itself, but an announcement would have been nice. Because I don’t usually walk around with so much money, I had to ask the whole team to borrow some cash. Yeah, cash was the only option.

First impression

As expected, the first impression was great. And I had high expectations because I owned a previous model already. The border less screen is a blast. The large bezel of some other devices is such an useless waste of space. Also the docking station works flawlessly. I had somehow the impression they had different models for America and Europe. But other than the power cord, I couldn’t tell anything that wouldn’t fit. Only one USB-C cable is between the dock and the notebook. This is enough for charging the notebook, connecting external monitors, USB3 devices and sound. Funny enough the Bluetooth LE Mouse has shorter wakeup times when the docking station is plugged in.
I don’t insist on linux being pre-installed to save the time installing. It is to make sure the drivers stay available also in the future. I want to make sure that the OEM’s are aware of the people who want to have sane operating systems on their devices. It is essentially the same reason I insisted on paying with BitCoin. It is my money that I spend, and thus I want my purchase to show up in the appropriate columns of the statistics. If people don’t care, some corrupt middle managers just make certain options harder to get and then claim nobody wanted them.
The only item that is not according to my wish list is the keyboard layout. I wanted a Swiss layout, but made the compromise to get a US keyboard because the other factors were more important to me. The plan was to get a swiss keyboard, and retrofit it myself. But when I look at the device now, I figured out that this wouldn’t be easy, as it would require a European palm rest. Thus I abandoned that plan. I had devices with US keyboards before. It’s no big deal, I just prefer the Swiss layout.

Installation

Every time I set up a new device, I follow the guides for installing with smartcard backed full disk encryption and smartcard backed ssh. I wanted to automate this process for a while. So I used the opportunity to write the scripts this time. Since I wanted the procedure to work reproducibly, I started over every time I missed something. In the end I installed the OS at least five times. The next script for installing all the software including those from personal packet archives is a classic. I probably created it almost a decade ago, and always refined it. I once tried to do something similar for Windows at work. But in the end I abandoned it.

Problems

No system is perfect, and especially notebooks are known to not always have perfect driver support for linux kernels. The Sputnik team certainly does a great job with routing all their tweaks upstream. So far, I only found two minor problems. Wifi and the touchscreen didn’t work after resuming. Since I use full disk encryption I, suspend only occasionally. The boot times are really ok anyway. This is my first notebook with a touch screen. I force myself to use it sometimes, but on such a small high res screen my fingers are just too big. So, it’s nice to have, but hardly essential.
It is also my first device with a 4k screen. Ubuntu does great with the scaling and settings. The only applications that don’t fully support high res that I found so far, are: electrum, bitsquare and openbazaar. Oh, and it would be nice if the applications used the DPI scaling of the screen they are currently displaying.
Last but not least, the battery time didn’t impress me the only two times I ran on battery so far. It hardly lasts for a full movie. But I will try terminating all my background tasks next time.

Update December 20th 2016

Here is a nice video describing the device:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvsgTJbIWNo

Categories: BitCoin, Software | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Decentralized websites and more

“Cool idea, but to be of any use, it would need more functionality and more content” was my impression when I first looked into zeronet. Back then static web pages were all there was, and no UI support for any managing tasks. The next time I checked, probably more than half a year later, it had a blog engine, subscription on the welcome page, mail, chat, forums, wiki, boards and more. Blogs was what hooked me this time. The interesting feature was that you could subscribe, and have the news listed on the hello page. So I started to write new blog posts both on wordpress and on zeronet. True, wordpress has lots of more functionality than the zeronet blog engine. Some things are nice gimmicks, but none of it is really essential. ZeroBlog is really all you need.
Some people started to leave twister for zeronet, but I couldn’t quite understand why. For me, it filled another niche. They are both very nice in their own way.

How it works

To create a site, you can execute a python command on the commandline, or simply clone an existing zite. In both cases, a private key is generated that you need to later sign the content. Signing is really easy, but you better take good care for your private keys. Make sure not to share them, but do make backups for yourself. From the private key, a public key is derived and from that a BitCoin address. The BitCoin address serves as the unique identifier for your zite. If this identifier looks too complicated, you can register a shorter name on the NameCoin blockchain, and link it to your bitcoin address for the zite. Once you sign and publish your zite, you can give the address to your friends, or publish it where other people can pick it up. Whenever another zeronet user requests your address, he sends the query into the mesh. Whoever is closest, serves the files anonymously. Now the user who visited, becomes a seeder who also serves your content. No central server required. Now you can switch off all your computers, and your zite is available. Your zite stays online for as long as there is at least one other user seeding it.

Proxies

To visit zeronet sites, or simply zites as they are called, you should run the zeronet client. The software is written in python with few dependencies. So it is really easy to run. You can either run it locally, or on a personal server. Then just visit the entry page with the browser and navigate from there. But if you want to visit a zite without installing any software, there are also public proxies. There are many reasons why running the software is better than using these proxies, but I won’t go into the details now. And I don’t list the proxies here.

ZeroMe

Then came merger zites. I read about the concept before the release, and was really curious. Some things are not as easy to accomplish with a decentralized anonymous system as with a centralized architecture. But when I had my first play with ZeroMe, my reaction was “Wow this is what I have been waiting for”. I don’t use most social media because of the centralized architecture, and because they own all the data of the users and can make with it whatever they please. There have been decentralized social platforms before, but they were usually a hassle to install and maintain or not so great from a usability standpoint. Now with ZeroMe you choose a hub to store your data, an identity provider, and a presentation. So you have three orthogonal aspects to your experience.

Data Hub

You can subscribe to as many hubs as you wish, but store your data to only one of them per identity. They can be organized by region, language or interests. The more you subscribe to, the more data will be stored on your harddrive, and the more bandwidth will be consumed. You can also run your own hub, and use it only with your friends.

Identity

The identities existed for a while. You needed an identity to write a blog, to comment on other people’s blogs, to write and receive ZeroMail, to write to boards and chats and talks and wikis. Again different identity providers have different requirements. For ZeroId you have to register your handle on the namecoin blockchain. For Zeroverse you had to send a bitmessage. For KaffieId no external proof is required. You can maintain as many identities as you like. Some can be more credible, others totally anonymous.

Presentation

The official frontend is Me.ZeroNetwork.bit. But as it is all opensource. The first forks or clones started to appear. There is the darker themed Dark ZeroMe. There is ZeroMe Plus which adds some nice features.

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Hike and Fly the “Kleiner Mythen”

I used to hike the smaller Mythen at least once a year with a paraglider on the back to fly down. Usually i took the Chaemi route which involves some light climbing. Many times I saw mountain goats, and once I slept near the top. Last year I didn’t make it, so I wanted to revive the tradition. Last Thursday I sent messages to some friends asking who would join. Pascal came. With good company the whole trip is even more pleasant. Just before we reached the summit, the fog came in and blocked the view in takeoff direction. We decided to descend. We almost reached Zwischenmythen when the fog lifted. So we hiked up again. The reward was a gentle glide into the sunset. I appreciated every second of the flight a lot more then if I went up with a cablecar.

DCIM103GOPRO

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Worst customer experience ever

The best notebook ever

I blogged about my attempts to buy a decent notebook here before. But let’s recap quickly. In the fall of 2013 I bought a Dell XPS13 Developer edition. When Dell shortly thereafter announced that they now accept BitCoin, I had the feeling I missed out on that opportunity. Nevertheless, it was the best computer I ever had. As it came with ubuntu preinstalled, there was no hassle with drivers. Everything just worked, it was lightning fast and gorgeous. But in February 2015 it was stolen.

Paying with BitCoin

I wanted to buy the same notebook again, but this time I wanted to pay with BitCoin. The option was not available for the Swiss market, but they expanded it to Canada and the UK. I really didn’t want to find out that it would be possible in Switzerland just after I ordered. Thus I decided to hold my breadth. The waiting became very long, as my ancient intermediary notebook was having thermal issues.

Purism

The selection of ultrabooks with linux pre-installed, that can be bought with BitCoin is not so large. If It has to have a backlit Swiss keyboard, it gets really difficult. But somehow I learned about purism. Their librem notebooks looked very good. As with most startups, the people were really approachable and helpful. I was ready to order their best machine, but they kept having delays. Delivery was always two months out. When it was pushed way back again, I decided I didn’t want to wait any longer, and re-targeted for the Dell.

UK

After a lot more than a year of waiting, and asking Dell to make the leap forward, I was ready to give up the Swiss keyboard. I was ready to order from the UK instead. I was ready to retrofit a Swiss keyboard myself, and pay double taxes. I found a service that would forward the parcel. But although BitCoin was listed as a payment option on the UK Dell website, the option was not available on the checkout screen. I reported this to Dell customer support and tried on a regular basis over the course of a month. Finally I gave up on the UK store.

US

The US store had a model with a 1TB SSD that was even better than the models offered in the European stores. So I went for that. All the mail forwarding services in the US either couldn’t process my card to cover their fees, or didn’t provide a phone number. But a domestic phone number was required for the order form at the Dell store. So I asked around if I could have my order delivered to somebody in the US, and he would forward it to me. A former co-worker who lives in California now agreed. I went ahead and placed the order to his address. Because I was really in need of the device, I chose the faster, more expensive delivery method. Shortly after I paid, I received an eMail stating that the formal order confirmation should follow in two days at the latest.

Black hole

That was the one and only, and the last communication I received from Dell. After a week I started to question why I didn’t receive the formal confirmation, and I found out that the order didn’t appear on the order status page. So I tried to contact Dell order support. In order to initiate a support session, one has to enter the order number. And because the order was not properly in the system, I couldn’t contact them. I tried different means to contact them almost on a daily basis. This week I could finally chat with a support representative. He couldn’t find my order in the system neither, and gave me an eMail address. So I wrote to what appears to be the main eMail address for customer support in the US. An automated response came immediately stating that a human would respond within 24 hours. Nobody ever did of course. I reached out to coinbase to ask about my transaction. They very quickly responded. They stated that on their side everything went through normally, and that Dell indeed received the money. Somebody on a forum suggested that the order might be canceled because of some obscure export regulations. But why a company would cancel an order on such a basis without ever notifying the customer is beyond me.
It has been almost a month now, that I have been desperately trying to find out, when I will receive the notebook that I really need. Dell didn’t even bother to tell me anything. How is that different from the worst scams and frauds out there on the internet? To me that was a lot of money that I sent. I thought of Dell as being trustworthy. No more…

Update September 8th 2016

Barton sent me a mail today stating that they found the problem. They made sure it doesn’t happen again. And the notebook should be delivered early next week. Looking forward…

Update September 22th 2016

The box with the precious new power machine was delivered to me today.
Hooray! Finally! Jay! So excited!
Now I know what I will do tonight… Setting it all up.

Categories: BitCoin, Software | Tags: , , , , | 3 Comments

Game modding with pen and paper

I have lots of good memories from youth camps. Some involve playing Donkey Kong and Mario Brothers while sitting on trees. Another classic video game was Asteroids. When I recently read an article in a German magazine about building an Asteroids clone with an Arduino and an OLED, lots of old memories resurfaced. The source code was provided, and the build was simple. As the control was used as digital, I didn’t use an analog joystick. When I gave it to the kids to play, they didn’t share the same enthusiasm that I had back then. But that’s probably because they grow up with lots more tiny computers than we had. So I wanted to involve them some more, and give them a sense of how this thing works. I don’t know how well they understood, when I explained them the concept of a pixel.
So I grabbed pen and paper, read the source code and drew the pixel art. Next, I told them they could modify the images to their liking, but still preserve the mechanics of the game. It was essentially the spaceship with one frame, the asteroid with three frames and the explosion with four frames. Seven year old Levin understood immediately, and painted his versions. For five year old Noah it might be a bit early, but he also participated enthusiastically.
All I had to do was transform their paintings back into source code and load it onto the AtMega chip. Now they were hooked a lot more to the game than before.

Categories: Family, Projects, Software | Tags: , | Leave a comment