How I wrecked the new glider by flying into a cable

We went skiing to Stoos lately. From time to time I went up to the Fronalpstock with the kids. Every time we were up there, I checked the conditions for paragliding. Every time, the wind was blowing from the back. Not very strong, but if it is from the wrong direction, it can be too much rather quickly.
When the day was almost over, I figured that I could also go to the Klingenstock, which is better shielded from southerly winds. When I reached the summit, there was virtually no wind at all. As the sun was already quite low, I could not spot some cables that I knew from the past. I knew I had to be especially careful.
I don’t fly at the Klingenstock very often, only once in a couple of years. The last time was with the speed wing, and I started close to the top on the west side. With the speed wing, I just glide with the skis and the glider comes up pretty quickly. I didn’t want to stretch the lines that quickly with the fragile single skin glider. That is why I descended a bit to a more flat area. I took off from there with a regular paraglider many years ago.
Now the single skin has a worse glide ratio compared to a regular glider. This is why after take off and flying straight for a while, I realized that it would get tight with clearing a small hill in front. My first reaction was to avoid it by flying left. But then I would cross the ski slope with very little ground clearance or possibly even having to land. This is not only forbidden, it can also be dangerous in some cases. So I decided to fly around the small hill on the right hand side. Thus I made a right turn of approximately 90 degrees.
And there it was. All of a sudden I saw a cable right in front of me frighteningly close. I had no time to think. Call it instinct or muscle memory, I immediately continued the right hand turn as hard as I could, to fly back to the slope. For a moment it looked almost as if I could clear the cable and perform a slope landing. But when I was only about 5 meters above ground, the upper left part of the lines connecting the glider to the harness collided with the cable. My forward movement came to a halt, and I slid down gently into the soft snow. Along the way down I could hear lines snapping and the fabric ripping. I was not injured or even hurt, but the glider looked like a wreck. I sent it for repair. But it turned out that it was a total loss. The glider was only two months old and had less than ten flights. Bad things always happen when the equipment is new! Like when I was ground handling a brand new glider 15 years ago, and a RC airplane hit it.
In the aftermath it is always important to analyze what went wrong, and what I should have done better.
The first and most important thing is that I was not hurt. But could I have saved the glider?
To save the glider after I saw the cable, I could stall or spin it. That way I would hit the ground before the cable or slip under it. But these procedures induce a pendulum moment and/or spin movement. This is not what you want close to the ground. The risk of injuries would be way too high. In school we learned that some people overreact in this sort of situation, and involuntarily stall or spin the glider. This often results in injuries. So I am relieved that my instinct reaction was just right. I would act the same way if I had the time to fully evaluate the situation.
If my reaction was correct after the fact, what could or should I do better that it couldn’t happen in the first place?
The easiest answer would be to look out carefully for any sort of obstacles. The bad part about this, is that I actually did that.
The next would be to inform about a flying area before going there. When leaving home, I expected to fly from Fronalpstock which I know fairly well. And even if I considered flying from Klingenstock, I don’t think I would look up the map with aerial obstacles, since I was flying there before. But maybe I should.
Cables can be dangerous also for other aerial vehicles like helicopters. There are efforts to remove cables that are no longer in use. So I asked the corporation that owns the land about the cable.
In the meantime I already received the replacement, which is the exact same model of single skin paraglider. Last weekend I used the new glider for the purpose that I bought it for : run and fly. I ran halfway up the Urmiberg an flew down.